BANK HISTORY



Mack Blake

Owned and operated a multi-state wholesale dry goods company.  He was a founding investor in Liberty National Bank formed in 1918 with offices near his Oklahoma City storefront. The U.S. Comptroller, recognizing his role as a business leader, appointed Blake president of the reorganized Security National Bank of Lawton. This bank merged with Liberty in 1925.  In 1933, an estimated 4,000 banks failed with a loss of $140 billion in deposits.  The Great Depression ushered in a decade of severe economic hardships.  Blake mortgaged his home and invested his personal insurance policies to recapitalize Liberty Bank and avoid insolvency or forced sale.

John Kirkpatrick

U.S. Navy rear admiral, oilman, inventor, and philanthropist. After Mack Blake’s death, Kirkpatrick assumed control of his father-in-law’s role on the board of directors of Liberty National Bank. It flourished, becoming the Oklahoma’s second largest bank.  Oil prices dropped in 1981 and the state’s economy suffered, starting a string of bank failures including Penn Square Bank in 1982. By 1988 only two of Oklahoma’s ten largest banks remained, including Liberty.  Kirkpatrick devised the Oklahoma Plan to save the bank from forced sale.  The Kirkpatrick family pledged $20 million to recapitalize the bank which ultimately led to its economic recovery.

Christian Keesee

Businessman, art collector, chair of all Kirkpatrick enterprises and philanthropies, founder of Green Box Arts Festival.   At age 13, Keesee took a summer job at May Avenue Bank and later the next year at United Oklahoma Bank.  He continued working in various banking enterprises during the summer before starting college.  While in college and just after his graduation, Keesee increased his role with the family’s charitable enterprises including the Oklahoma Art Center. In 1988, Keesee joined his family in ratifying the Oklahoma Plan to recapitalize Liberty, and the following year he oversaw the purchase of American Bancorp and became its chairman.  Under his leadership the bank acquired other small banks in Oklahoma, Texas, and later Colorado. Ultimately, several of these banks were unified into Kirkpatrick Bank.  The bank has grown steadily and profitably even through the dark days of 2009, when the country again saw record numbers of bank failures.

1970

American Bank of Edmond Building Corp. is chartered. The bank will change its name twice by 1973, first to American Bank of Edmond, and then to American Bank & Trust.

1970

1985

American Bancorp of Edmond is established and purchases American Bank & Trust stock.

1985

1988

Christian Keesee acquires an interest in American Bancorp of Edmond Inc. Within the year, Keesee acquires 98% share of the Corporation and is named Chairman.

1988

1989

Keesee moves to expand American and acquires Heritage National Bank in Edmond. American Capital Mortgage is formed in that year. The Bank provides incubator space to assist fledgling Fine Arts Institute of Edmond as it establishes classes and programs.

1989

1995

American Bank & Trust acquires 100% of the stock of American Capital Mortgage Company. American Bank & Trust celebrates its 25th anniversary with a newly remodeled building.

1995

1997

American Bank & Trust launches its check card, an innovative payment method largely in use by national banks, the card functions as both a payment method for purchases and as an ATM card to access cash and check account balances.

1997

1999

American Bank & Trust innovates internet banking for personal banking customers with a program called "Banking by Home Computer."

1999

2001

American Bank & Trust merges with Farmers Bank in Ault, Colorado and forms Intermountain Bank in Colorado Springs.

2001

2002

American Bank & Trust opens branches in Oklahoma City and Edmond, Oklahoma. The bank is now the largest in Edmond, holding 20% of local deposits. The Bank’s distinctive Drive-In and Courtyard located at the northeast corner of 15th Street & Broadway in Edmond wins the annual Central States Region Design Award. The Courtyard features a large Keith Haring Sculpture.

2002

2003

Total assets exceed $250 million for the first time at year end.

2003

2004

American Bank & Trust changes its name to Kirkpatrick Bank.

2004

2006

Kirkpatrick Bank becomes the presenting sponsor for Midnight Streak, a race benefitting access to arts education for City Arts Center.

2006

2007

Kirkpatrick Bank continues to expand its technological capabilities, with two initiatives. First, a web-based savings account, including online account opening, called Savings Square (within a year, Savings Square has attracted customers in all 50 states, with over $40 million in deposits). Second, the bank launches electronic billpay for its internet banking customers.

2007

2008

Kirkpatrick Bank offers businesses the convenience of remote deposit. The Bank provides incubator space to Angels Foster Family Network.

2008

2009

Kirkpatrick Bank sponsors Green Box Arts Festival in Colorado Springs.

2009

2010

Total assets exceed $500 million for the first time at year end, despite the challenges of a national economic crisis.

2010

2012

Kirkpatrick Bank launches mobile banking and adds person-to-person electronic payment called POP Money. In Colorado, the bank doubles the size and capability of its team, adding cash management expertise and instituting a Community Advisory Board.

2012

2013

Checking Square is added to Savings Square. Kirkpatrick Bank becomes an investor in the Colorado Springs Regional Business Alliance which seeks to revitalize downtown.

2013

2014

Kirkpatrick Bank opens a new location in Oklahoma City to serve its growing commercial customer business. It continues to expand technological capabilities and adds the convenience of depositing checks via a smart phone. The Bank installs a new sculpture, Momentum by Marko Kratohvil.

2014

2015

Kirkpatrick Bank in Colorado grows significantly. The Colorado Springs branch moves to a new downtown location and adds a commercial drive through service. The Bank opens a new branch in Denver, Colorado.

2015